Stream-of-consciousness reporting

There was a story I read somewhere about a famous baseball star in

America who used to complain that reporters were misrepresenting interviews he gave them when they edited them for their newspapers; so the

journalists decided to avenge themselves by reporting his interviews strictly verbatim and in doing so made him come across like a fool.

For

years now, I’ve followed tennis (at first, because I used to gamble large amounts of money on it; now only out of habit) and the governing body, the

ATP, who demand players always give post-match interviews, maintain a similar verbatim practice. I’ve always wondered why.

This is Nadal on finally losing his 38 game winning streak to Djokovic

yesterday:

“I think he wants to be No. 1, too, no? But right now, first of all, I am not yet No. 1. Second, I played a very good

tournament here in Cincinnati, semifinal, and after winning in Toronto is almost perfect. So I played my best summer hard season in my life, so I am

very happy for that. Today he played unbelievable in the first set. In the second, I felt well, in some moment I felt I was playing better than him.

Finally, he beat me. He had the break at five-all. So I just congratulate him because he’s playing well. You know how tennis is. Probably I wasn’t

at my 100% condition. During all this tournament I didn’t play my best much. Today I think in the second set I played better than the days before, so

happy for that because I end the tournaments with good feelings.”

And on becoming #1:

“Well, there are so many

different things, no, so difficult to compare. But when you win Roland Garros it’s in the moment, no? It’s, I don’t know, very emotional. Right now

I know I going to be No. 1 and I’m very, very happy to be No. 1. Be No. 1 always is, I think, is a present for a lot of work in the past, no? So

that’s satisfying me a lot. But for be No. 1 you only can be No. 1 winning Roland Garros, Wimbledon, so…

“I am very happy but at the same

time, my goal is continuing be there (at No. 1). So my goal is continuing be there Olympics and US Open, so no time for enjoy.”

And

just to demonstrate it’s not just people who are operating in a second language, here’s Roddick on withdrawing from the

tournament:

“I mean I’ve been feeling fine. I got in practices yesterday and the days before. I fell asleep last night. I was pretty

tired. I fell asleep and woke up and I still had the lights on in my room. I just kind of passed out. I think when I did, we’re guessing it was in

had the wrong position or whatnot. I woke up this morning and something in my neck and kind of any activity is causing it to flare up. I went out and

tried to warm for about five minutes at about 5:00. I mean, we’ve been getting treatment all day. You asked what was leading up. Went to a

chiropractor and we had Doug work on it. We’ve had kind of everyone take a crack at it today.

“Tried to hit at 5:00; didn’t go so hot. Went

out for some more treatment. Tried to take some painkillers and whatnot. You know, I thought I might be able to give it a go if it didn’t get any

worse. My second or third serve in warm up out there just got definitely worse, kind of just to the point where it’s tough to move my head right

now.”

I always find them hilarious, but also they manage to convey something of the players’ character which is missing from the dull

relentless prose of the journalist (as it is from the literature derived from that same wretched school).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s