‘Lost’ Dylan Thomas screenplay found in Obooki’s flat

There are a couple of reports today (here, for instance, and here) about a “lost” Dylan Thomas screenplay, based on Stevenson’s The Beach of Falesa, being found in a house in Australia and now to be produced by BBC Radio 3. This reminded me of the copy of this screenplay I had in my own flat, which I had never realised was so important to literary history (the cheap mass-market pulp edition certainly didn’t indicate it).

The Independent says “it was largely forgotten after Thomas’s death in 1953”, though this apparently didn’t exclude Jonathan Cape from publishing it in 1954, or it being again published by Panther books in 1966 (my edition), and looking at Amazon certainly published in other editions before and since. (It is copyrighted by The Hearst Corporation in 1959, and by Viking Films Inc in 1963, though knowing the way film rights work I assume these will have lapsed.)

“It was published in a very limited run. I came across it by chance. You would have to be a real aficionado to know about it.” – I am a bit obsessed with Thomas’ prose work, it’s true. I keep meaning to read it alongside Stevenson, and post my findings.

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2 thoughts on “‘Lost’ Dylan Thomas screenplay found in Obooki’s flat

  1. Fascinating, and I look forward to reading about your findings, but what I really want is Richard Burton resurrected to make the film.

  2. The film would have been good, with perhaps Dylan Thomas doing the voiceover. – It seems, from what I’ve read elsewhere (not the book itself), that the screenplay starts well but then, as so often with his prose works, Thomas seems to lose interest halfway through.

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